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“Fuji” etching by Norman Stevens [Alamy image ref. C2YG5P]

Norman Stevens (b.1937 – d.1988) was a painter and printmaker who attended Bradford Regional College of Art from 1952 to 1957. At the college he led a group of talented painters – David Hockney, David Oxtoby, John Loker, Michael Vaughan and Norman Stevens – dubbed the “Bradford Mafia” by poet and writer Edward Lucie-Smith.

Stevens’ art took a while to settle into a distinctive style, not fitting into the neat categories of commercial or “pop art”. After completing his art school training at Bradford College of Art he took up a career teaching at Manchester College of Art (where I studied in the early 1960s under Liverpool pop-poet Adrian Henry). In 1973 he took the leap and gave up teaching to earn his living by painting alone, but died of cancer at the early age of 51.

I can only find a poor reproduction of this etching entitled “Fuji” on the internet linked to “The Secret Intelligence Service, Vauxhall Cross, Albert Embankment” where the series must hang on it’s walls somewhere within the building.  I have all six of the series “Sites and Sight” which include China Wall, Easter Island, Fuji, Mount Etna, Palenque, and Pyramid – which I bought from Christie’s Contemporary Art, London, in 1974. The Tate Gallery has eighteen Norman Stevens works in it’s permanent collection, but not including any from this series… so perhaps they are to be found in his collections with the V&A or the MOMA, New York.

Mount Fuji is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776.24 m (12,389 ft) and is an active strato-volcano that last erupted in 1707–08. Mount Fuji lies about 100 kilometres (62 miles) south-west of Tokyo and can be seen from there on a clear day. Mount Fuji’s exceptionally symmetrical cone, which is snow-capped several months a year, is a well-known symbol of Japan and it is frequently depicted in art and photographs. There is a well-known Japanese saying which suggests that anybody would be a fool not to climb Mount Fuji once – but a fool to do so twice.

The RM image was licensed by Alamy for reproduction to illustrate editorial material in a 25,000 print-run bi-monthly magazine in the United States under my “Beaux Arts” pseudonym.

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